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Does CrossFit Need Fixing? And If So, How?

 

The CrossFit movement has truly been pivotal in providing both the context and platform for generations of beginners and seasoned athletes to become better. It has given them a chance to push themselves to new heights. But having said that, it hasn't been without its own naysayers and those who oppose some of the methods associated with the fitness movement and namely the time-based Workout of the Day (WOD), especially Max Shank. 

But it's not all bad news, Shank proposes a simple, yet effective way of ensuring safety for the athletes, ridding them of any dangers and potential injuries as you near the final reps of a grueling and technical lift. Lifts would effectively be classified as what is defined by "High Skill" where "you must do this movement with little to no fatigue, lower repetitions, and adequate rest" and "Low Skill" where you can "Go fast and lots of reps. Get after it, you lazy SOB." 

Breaking up these movements will be the first step in carefully defining which movements are safe for you to execute against the clock, and which ones can be more conducive to you getting better as an athlete. 

Head over to T-Nation to see Max Shank's full suggestion on fixing CrossFit.

XGo fast and lots of reps. Get after it, you lazy SOB. I'm giving you the green light.Go fast and lots of reps. Get after it, you lazy SOB. I'm giving you the green light.Go fast and lots of reps. Get after it, you lazy SOB. I'm giving you the green light.

  • Eugene Kan
  • CrossFitEnduranceGymLiftingSafetyStrengthWOD

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