s
Foundation

 

The team behind SMAAT shared a profound interest in the relationship between footwear and performance long before the inception of the brand. Despite differences in career paths, and the angles on lifestyle and performance that accompanied those paths, the betterment of footwear design through performance and aesthetics was shared unanimously amongst the team. Looking back, each of us was born into a generation of running footwear that stressed more cushioning, more stability and more shoe as an absolute necessity for running performance and safety. However, we’ve long believed that the design ethos of “less is more” seen in other design mediums was fully applicable to footwear. Despite the performance connotations of SMAAT, we believe there is a continual blurring of the line between lifestyle and performance. This is where we stand and hope that many more will embrace this connection in their daily lives and see SMAAT as an everyday tool. 

  

 

Since the invention of the modern running shoe and the explosion of running as a pastime, naturally efficient and biomechanically sound movements have been needlessly subjected to change, rendering such a wonderfully simple activity as running senselessly complex. We have all witnessed the widespread adoption of improper, overbuilt footwear emphasizing ineffecient technique that has potentially injury-inducing1-5 and performance hindering habits6-9. With SMAAT, we hope to offer the solutions that maintain only what is absolutely necessary. Running in itself is one of the greatest joys once you find your rhythm… but frustrating when you’re dealing with pain and stagnation.

 
At the end of the day SMAAT wants to play a pivotal role in in your desire to run. We wish to embrace and reinforce the abilities of the foot through SMAAT.  We believe the foot should dictate how it interacts with the surfaces it traverses. But ultimately the goal lies in providing people with the greatest and most enjoyable experience possible. 
 
SMAAT, Make It Matter.
 
  • Hreljac A, Marshall RN, Hume PA. Evaluation of lower extremity overuse injury potential in runners. Med Sci Sports Exerc 2000;32(9):1635-1641.
  • Diebal AR, Gregory R, Alitz C, Gerber JP. Forefoot running improves pain and disability associated with chronic exertional compartment syndrome. Am J Sports Med 2012;40(5):1060-1067.
  • Daoud AI, Geissler GJ, Wang F, et al. Foot strike and injury rates in endurance runners: a retrospective study. Med Sci Sport Exerc 2012 Jan 3.
  • Diebal AR, Gregory R, Alitz C, Gerber JP. Forefoot running improves pain and disability associated with chronic exertional compartment syndrome. Am J Sports Med 2012;40(5):1060-1067.
  • Cheung RT, Davis IS. Landing pattern modification to improve patellofemoral pain in runners: a case series. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2011;41(12):914-919.
  • Perl DP, Daoud AL, Liberman DE. Effects of Footwear and Strike Type on Running Economy. Med Sci Sports Exerc 2012;44(7):1335-1343.
  • Ardigò LP, Lafortuna C, Minetti AE, Mognoni P, Saibene F. Metabolic and mechanical aspects of foot landing type, forefoot and rearfoot strike, in human running. Acta Physiol Scand. 1995 Sep;155(1):17-22.
  • Scholz1 MN, Bobbert1 MF, van Soest1 AJ, Clark JR, and van Heerden J. Running biomechanics: shorter heels, better economy. J Exp Biol 2008 Oct;211:3266-3271.
  • Hasegawa H, Yamauchi T, Kraemer WJ. Foot strike patterns of runners at the 15-km point during an elite-level half marathon. J Strength Cond Res 2007 Aug;21(3):888-93.
 

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